• Journal Article

Older, but Not Wiser: How Men Get Information about AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases after High School

Citation

Bradner, C. H., Ku, L., & Lindberg, L. D. (2000). Older, but Not Wiser: How Men Get Information about AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases after High School. Family Planning Perspectives, 32(1), 33-38.

Abstract

Context: As they reach adulthood, young men are less likely to use condoms and are at increased risk for exposure to AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Little is known about which prevention efforts reach men in their 20s. Methods: Longitudinal data from the 1988, 1990-1991 and 1995 waves of the National Survey of Adolescent Males are used to identify sources of information about AIDS and STDs among 1,290 young men aged 22-26. Information receipt from four main sources, the topics covered by each source and the personal characteristics associated with getting more information are all explored. Results: Twenty-two percent of men surveyed discussed disease prevention topics with a health provider in the last year, 48% attended a lecture or read a brochure, 51% spoke to a partner, friend or family member, and 96% heard about AIDS or STDs from the media (e.g., television advertisements, radio or magazine). Excluding media sources, 30% of young men reported getting no STD or AIDS prevention messages in the last year. Being black or Hispanic, having had a physical exam or an AIDS test in the last year, and having had discussions about AIDS or STDs with parents or a health care provider in the past were associated with receiving more information. Conclusions: Although young men who are at higher risk for STD or HIV infection are more likely than other young men to get information about disease prevention, young adult men are much less likely than adolescents to receive AIDS or STD prevention education. More prevention efforts need to be aimed at young adults