• Journal Article

Elevated soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, elevated Homocyst(e)inemia, and hypertriglyceridemia in relation to preeclampsia risk

Citation

Vadachkoria, S., Woelk, G., Mahomed, K., Qiu, C., Muy-Rivera, M., Malinow, M. R., & Williams, M. A. (2006). Elevated soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, elevated Homocyst(e)inemia, and hypertriglyceridemia in relation to preeclampsia risk. American Journal of Hypertension, 19(3), 235-242.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We examined the relationship of maternal plasma concentrations of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), a specific marker of endothelial dysfunction, and risk of preeclampsia. We also evaluated the relationship in the presence and absence of maternal hypertriglyceridemia and hyperhomocystein(e)mia. METHODS: A total of 170 women with preeclampsia and 184 control subjects were included in this case-control study analysis. Maternal postdiagnosis plasma sVCAM-1 concentrations were determined using immunoassays. Total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection procedures; and triglyceride concentrations were determined using standard enzymatic procedures. Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: The relative risk of preeclampsia (as estimated by the OR) was increased 3.6-fold for women with sVCAM-1 concentrations >/=842 ng/mL compared with women who had lower concentrations (OR = 3.6; 95% CI 1.8 to 7.4). Of the three biological markers investigated, elevated sVCAM-1 concentrations was most strongly related to preeclampsia risk (OR = 4.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 13.5), followed by hyperhomocysten(e)mia (OR = 2.4, 95% CI 0.8 to 7.4) and hypertriglyceridemia (OR = 2.1, 95% CI 0.9 to 5.0). Compared with women who did not have any of the three risk factors, those with all three risk factors had an extremely high risk of preeclampsia (OR = 26.4; 95% CI 8.5 to 81.9). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that elevated sVCAM-1 concentrations are associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia. Our findings extend the literature by documenting progressively increased risk with increasing numbers of biological markers of dyslipidemia and endothelial dysfunction