• Report

PhenX—Establishing a consensus process to select common measures for collaborative research

Citation

Maiese, D. R., Hendershot, T., Strader, L., Wagener, D., Hammond, J., Huggins, B., ... Hamilton, C. (2013). PhenX—Establishing a consensus process to select common measures for collaborative research. (RTI Press Publication No. MR-0027-1310). Research Triangle Park, NC: RTI Press. DOI: 10.3768/rtipress.2013.mr.0027.1310

Abstract

The PhenX (consensus measures for Phenotypes and eXposures) Toolkit offers well-established, broadly validated measures of phenotypes and exposures relevant to investigators in human genomics, epidemiology, and biomedical research. This methods report describes the infrastructure and processes used to develop the content and features of the Toolkit. The PhenX consensus process is robust, yet flexible, as evidenced by its application to a range of research domains. During the initial phase of PhenX from March 2008 through April 2010, working groups of content experts addressed 21 research domains and selected 295 measures for the Toolkit. The PhenX Steering Committee prioritized and defined the scope of the domains and guided the consensus process with input from liaisons representing the National Institutes of Health. After the 21 domains were completed, another project to add breadth and depth to the Toolkit for substance abuse and addiction (SAA) research served to validate the consensus process. With the support of the SAA Scientific Panel to define the scope for one core and six specialty collections and SAA working groups to select measures, the PhenX project team added 44 measures to the Toolkit in 2012. The PhenX Toolkit, now being used by more than 1,000 researchers, offers a catalog of measures, supporting documentation, and tools for collaborative research. It used a consensus process that can serve as a template for investigators who are considering a similar approach.

Author Details

DR Maiese

Deborah R. Maiese, MPA, is the PhenX consensus coordinator and serves as a consultant to the Research Computing Division at RTI International.

Tabitha Hendershot

Tabitha P. Hendershot, BA, the PhenX co-investigator, is a research public health analyst in the Health Sciences Division at RTI.

Lisa Strader

Lisa C. Strader, MPH, a former PhenX co-investigator, is a senior research epidemiologist and manager of RTI’s Global Epidemiology and Health Research Program.

Diane Wagener

Diane K. Wagener, PhD, was a senior epidemiologist in RTI’s Statistics and Epidemiology program and the Principal Investigator of the Models of Infectious Disease Agents (MIDAS) Informational Technology Resource at RTI International.

Jane Hammond

Jane A. Hammond, PhD, is a PhenX working group supervisor and a senior research psychologist in the Health Sciences Division at RTI.

RK Kwok

Richard K. Kwok, PhD, a former PhenX working group supervisor, is a staff scientist in the Epidem iology Branch at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Dana Hancock

Dana B. Hancock, PhD, is a PhenX working group supervisor and a genetic epidemiologist in the Behavioral Health Epidemiology Program at RTI.

Nedra Whitehead

Nedra S. Whitehead, PhD, is a member of the PhenX Toolkit development team and a senior genetic epidemiologist in RTI’s Genomics, Statistical Genetics, and Environmental Research Program.

Destiney Nettles

Destiney S. Nettles, BA, is a PhenX project administrator, PhenX working group manager, and project administration specialist in the Molecular Epidemiology, Genomics, Environment and Health Division at RTI.

Joseph Pratt

Joseph G. Pratt, MPM, is the PhenX project manager and associate director of Molecular Epidemiology, Genomics, Environment and Health Division at RTI.

MS Scott

Marcia S. Scott, PhD, is the PhenX liaison from National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), NIH, and is a program director in the Division of Epidemiology and Prevention Research at NIAAA.

KP Conway

Kevin P. Conway, PhD, is the PhenX liaison from National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), NIH, and is Deputy Director of the Division of Epidemiology and Prevention Research at NIDA.

HA Junkins

Heather A. Junkins, MS, is a health science analyst in the Division of Genomic Medicine, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.

EM Ramos

Erin M. Ramos, PhD, is the PhenX project scientist in the Division of Genomic Medicine, NHGRI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.

Carol Hamilton

Carol M. Hamilton, PhD, is the PhenX principal investigator and Director of the Bioinformatics Program, Research Computing Division, at RTI.