• Article

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of infections during pregnancy: implementation of recommended interventions, United States, 2003-2004

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to describe prenatal screening, positive test rates, and the administration of indicated interventions for hepatitis B, rubella, syphilis, group B streptococcus (GBS), chlamydia, and gonorrhea in the United States using 2 population-based surveys. STUDY DESIGN: Both surveys abstracted demographic, prenatal, and delivery data from a representative sample of delivering women in 10 states. Analyses accounted for the complex sampling design. RESULTS: Among the 7691 and 19,791 women in the 2 studies, screened proportions before delivery were more than 90% for hepatitis B and rubella, 80% for syphilis, 72-85% for GBS, and less than 80% for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Inadequate prenatal care was the strongest factor associated with no screening. Administration of interventions indicated by positive test results was variable but generally low. CONCLUSION: Improved prenatal screening and administration of indicated treatments or interventions, particularly for syphilis, GBS, chlamydia, and gonorrhea, will further protect newborns from infection

Citation

Koumans, E. H. A., Rosen, J., van Dyke, M. K., Zell, E., Phares, C. R., Taylor, A., ... Schrag, S. (2012). Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of infections during pregnancy: implementation of recommended interventions, United States, 2003-2004. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 206(2), Article No. 158.e1. DOI: 10.1016/j.ajog.2011.08.027