• Journal Article

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of infections during pregnancy: implementation of recommended interventions, United States, 2003-2004

Citation

Koumans, E. H. A., Rosen, J., van Dyke, M. K., Zell, E., Phares, C. R., Taylor, A., ... Schrag, S. (2012). Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of infections during pregnancy: implementation of recommended interventions, United States, 2003-2004. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 206(2), Article No. 158.e1. DOI: 10.1016/j.ajog.2011.08.027

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to describe prenatal screening, positive test rates, and the administration of indicated interventions for hepatitis B, rubella, syphilis, group B streptococcus (GBS), chlamydia, and gonorrhea in the United States using 2 population-based surveys. STUDY DESIGN: Both surveys abstracted demographic, prenatal, and delivery data from a representative sample of delivering women in 10 states. Analyses accounted for the complex sampling design. RESULTS: Among the 7691 and 19,791 women in the 2 studies, screened proportions before delivery were more than 90% for hepatitis B and rubella, 80% for syphilis, 72-85% for GBS, and less than 80% for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Inadequate prenatal care was the strongest factor associated with no screening. Administration of interventions indicated by positive test results was variable but generally low. CONCLUSION: Improved prenatal screening and administration of indicated treatments or interventions, particularly for syphilis, GBS, chlamydia, and gonorrhea, will further protect newborns from infection