• Conference Proceeding

Use of nanofibers in high-efficiency solid-state lighting

Citation

Davis, J. L., Walls, H. J., Han, L., Walker, T. A., Tufts, J. A., Andrady, A., & Ensor, D. (2007). Use of nanofibers in high-efficiency solid-state lighting. In [6669], p. 666916. .

Abstract

Nanofibers made from non-absorbing polymers such as poly(methyl methacrylate) are solid structures that have one dimension (diameter) in the 10-1,000 nanometer (nm) range, while the other dimension (length) can be quite long. These nanofibers can be formed in either an oriented or random packing structure, and the surface morphology of the fiber can range from smooth to nanoporous. Quantum dots (QD) or other luminescent nanoparticles (diameter 1-10 nm) can be added to the nanofiber to create the photoluminescent nanofiber (PLN). Because PLNs are nanocomposites of fluorescent nanoparticles and polymer nanofibers, the optical properties of the nanocomposite, including absorption, emission, and light scattering, can be tailored for application-specific requirements. Nanofibers may have several applications in solid-state lighting, including serving as a light diffuser, providing optical filtering of low photopic sensitive wavelengths (i.e., blue) to increase conversion to higher luminosity wavelengths, and providing a convenient vehicle for handling and blending QDs to achieve a high color-rendering index.