• Journal Article

Testing antimicrobial paint efficacy on gypsum wallboard contaminated with Stachybotrys chartarum

Citation

Menetrez, M. Y., Foarde, K., Webber, T. D., Dean, R., & Betancourt, D. A. (2008). Testing antimicrobial paint efficacy on gypsum wallboard contaminated with Stachybotrys chartarum. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 5(2), 63-66.

Abstract

The goal of this research was to reduce occupant exposure to indoor mold through the efficacy testing of antimicrobial paints. An accepted method for handling Stachybotrys chartarum-contaminated gypsum wallboard (GWB) is removal and replacement. This practice is also recommended for water-damaged or mold-contaminated GWB but is not always followed completely. The efficacy of antimicrobial paints to eliminate or control mold regrowth on surfaces can be tested easily on nonporous surfaces. The testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces found in the indoor environment, such as gypsum wallboard, can be more complicated and prone to incorrect conclusions regarding residual organisms. The mold S. chartarum has been studied for toxin production and its occurrence in water-damaged buildings. Research to control its growth using seven different antimicrobial paints and two commonly used paints on contaminated, common gypsum wallboard was performed in laboratory testing at high relative humidity. The results indicate differences in antimicrobial efficacy for the period of testing, and that proper cleaning and resurfacing of GWB with an antimicrobial paint can be an option in those unique circumstances when removal may not be possible