• Journal Article

Serotonergic Drugs do Not Substitute for Clozapine in Clozapine-Trained Rats in A 2-Lever Drug Discrimination Procedure

Citation

Wiley, J., & Porter, J. H. (1992). Serotonergic Drugs do Not Substitute for Clozapine in Clozapine-Trained Rats in A 2-Lever Drug Discrimination Procedure. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 43(3), 961-965.

Abstract

The atypical neuroleptic clozapine has been shown to have cue properties in two-lever drug discrimination procedures. Although it has been demonstrated that clozapine acts at several types of receptors in vitro and in vivo, including dopamine, serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)], and acetylcholine receptors, the mechanism of action for its discriminative stimulus properties has not yet been determined. The present study examined the effects of haloperidol (D2 dopamine antagonist), ritanserin (5-HT2 antagonist), 1-alphaH,3-alpha,5-alphaH-tropan-3yl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL 72222) (5-HT3 antagonist), and buspirone (5-HT1A agonist) in stimulus substitution tests with rats trained to discriminate clozapine (5.0 mg/kg, IP) from vehicle in a two-lever drug discrimination procedure under a fixed ratio 30 schedule of food reinforcement. Analysis of the results revealed that, while clozapine produced dose-dependent responding on the clozapine lever, haloperidol and the three serotonin drugs failed to produce full substitution for clozapine at any of the doses tested. These results suggest that the discriminative stimulus properties are not mediated by D2 dopamine receptor blockade, antagonism at 5-HT2 or 5-HT3 receptors, or agonistic activity at 5-HT1A receptors. The neural basis of clozapine's discriminative stimulus properties has not yet been determined