• Article

Patterns of marijuana use in a 6-month pain management sample in the United States

Citation

Smiley McDonald, H., Moore, K., Heller, D., Ropero Miller, J., McIntire, G., & Wallace, F. (2017). Patterns of marijuana use in a 6-month pain management sample in the United States. Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment, 11, 1-9. DOI: 10.1177/1178221817724783

Abstract

This study is a 6-month retrospective analysis of urine drug testing (UDT) data from a pain management population among specimens with clinician-ordered marijuana testing (N=194,809). Descriptive statistics about the specimen positivity of clinician-ordered marijuana UDT are provided as well as other drug positivity. Specimens from males and adults age 18–34 had the highest prevalence rates of marijuana positivity. The prevalence of past-month marijuana use among a comparative national population were lower than the prevalence of positive marijuana tests in the UDT specimens by all characteristics. Among the specimens tested for illicit drugs and marijuana, 4.0% were positive for amphetamine, 2.8% were positive for cocaine, and 0.9% were positive for heroin. The most common prescription drugs listed were opioids (64.7%), benzodiazepines (20.5%), and antidepressants (19.9%). In sum, the findings reflect previous research showing high rates of marijuana use, illicit drug use, and prescription drug use in a pain management population.