• Editorial

Optimisation of inhaled tuberculosis therapies and implications for host–pathogen interactions

Citation

Hickey, A., Misra, A., & Robertson, B. D. (2011). Optimisation of inhaled tuberculosis therapies and implications for host–pathogen interactions. Tuberculosis, 91(1), 64. DOI: 10.1016/j.tube.2010.10.002

Abstract

Since tuberculosis is primarily a lung disease, inhalation therapies deserve consideration as an important way of conveying anti-tuberculosis drugs and vaccines to the lungs

The use of inhaled drug therapies to relieve the symptoms of respiratory distress can be traced to the use of smoke from the combustion of stramonium alkaloids in the Indus valley several thousands of years ago. In modern times, sophisticated technologies have been developed for treatment of the cause and symptoms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Several antimicrobials have been delivered to the lungs to treat local infections since the discovery of penicillin, but most of the published reports are off-label studies by clinicians treating intransigent disease. The use of tobramycin to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis may be the most significant antimicrobial product developed for aerosol delivery and is of direct relevance to consideration of inhaled drug therapies for tuberculosis.