• Journal Article

Functional status at 18 months of age as a predictor of childhood disability after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

Citation

Natarajan, G., Shankaran, S., Pappas, A., Bann, C., Tyson, J. E., McDonald, S., ... Higgins, R. (2014). Functional status at 18 months of age as a predictor of childhood disability after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 56(11), 1052-1058. DOI: 10.1111/dmcn.12512

Abstract

AimIn children with neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), we examined the association between 18-month functional status by parental report and disability at 6-7 years. MethodProspective observational study involving participants in the NICHD randomized controlled trial of hypothermia for HIE. Parent questionnaires-Functional Status-II (FS-II), Impact on Family (IOF) and Family Resource Scale (FRS) at 18 months were correlated with 6- to 7-year developmental assessments. Disability at 6-7 years was defined as IQ < 70, gross motor functional classification scale level III-V, bilateral blindness, deafness, or epilepsy. ResultsRates of severe HIE (32 vs. 15%), public insurance (73% vs. 47%) and IOF scales were higher and mean (SD) FS-II independence (I) {54 (SD 35) vs. 98 (SD 8)} and general health (GH) {87 (SD 14) vs. 98 (SD 6)} scores were significantly lower in children with disability (n=37) at 6-7 years, compared to those (n=74) without disability. FS-II I scores were significantly associated with disability (OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.87-0.97; p=0.003). On path analysis, severe HIE, greater IOF and public insurance were associated with poorer 18-month FS-II I scores, which, in turn, were associated with disability at 6 to 7 years. InterpretationPoor independent functioning by parental report at 18 months in children with HIE was associated with childhood disability