• Journal Article

Chewing gum affects smoking topography

Citation

Cohen, L. M., DiBenedetti, D., Collins, F. L., Stott, H. D., & Carter, L. C. (1999). Chewing gum affects smoking topography. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 7(4), 444-447.

Abstract

In a previous study, Wrigley's chewing gum was shown to reduce cravings to smoke and nicotine withdrawal when smokers were not allowed access to cigarettes. The present study expanded these findings by examining smoking behavior of 20 dependent cigarette smokers who were allowed free access to cigarettes throughout the study session but were encouraged and rewarded not to smoke. Each experimental session consisted of the participant watching a movie, then waiting an additional 30 min. Half of the participants were assigned to a gum condition in which they were asked to chew at least one piece of gum and had free access to chewing gum throughout the experimental session; half were assigned to a no-gum control. Results from this study indicate that when gum was present, participants took significantly fewer puffs and abstained for a longer period of time until their first cigarette. These results suggest that chewing gum may facilitate quit attempts