• Journal Article

Cost-effectiveness of a randomized trial to treat depression among Latinos

Citation

Kafali, E., Cook, B., Canino, G., & Alegria, M. (2014). Cost-effectiveness of a randomized trial to treat depression among Latinos. Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, 17(2), 41-50.

Abstract

This paper analyzes the cost-effectiveness of different treatments for depression among Latinos. As part of a randomized trial, patients with depression were randomized into three groups: usual care, telephone cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and face-to-face CBT. The goal of this paper is to (i) compare the cost-effectiveness of telephone and face-to-face CBT to usual care; (ii) compare the cost-effectiveness of telephone CBT directly to face-to-face CBT. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between groups are computed by dividing the incremental difference in mental health care costs by the incremental difference in two mental health outcomes: Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL). We find that both intervention groups are associated with significantly reduced (improved) scores in PHQ9 and HSCL compared to usual care. Phone CBT is significantly less costly (by $501) and more cost effective than face-to-face in terms of improvement in PHQ9 scores.