• Article

Behavioural precursors and HIV testing behaviour among African American women

Objective: To examine whether there is an association between knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, reported intentions to get an HIV test, and reported HIV testing behaviour at a later date among a sample of African American women.

Design: Secondary analysis of data collected from October 2007 through March 2008 for a randomized controlled experiment that was one part of a comprehensive evaluation of the ‘Take Charge. Take the Test’ HIV social marketing campaign.

Method: A series of logistic regression models were estimated to assess the effects of baseline knowledge and attitudes and beliefs on intention at two and six weeks post-baseline. Logistic regression models were also estimated to assess the effects of intention on HIV testing at both follow-ups.

Results: A statistically-significant association between baseline attitudes and beliefs and subsequent HIV testing intentions was found. Knowing where to get a free HIV test at baseline was also significantly associated with reported intentions at follow-up. Reported intentions were significantly associated with reported HIV testing at follow-up.

Conclusion: The study’s findings reiterate the importance of applying behaviour change theories and measuring behavioural precursors in the design and evaluation of HIV testing campaigns.

Citation

Uhrig, J., Davis, K., Rupert, D., & Fraze, J. (2012). Behavioural precursors and HIV testing behaviour among African American women. Health Education Journal, 71(1), 102-114. https://doi.org/10.1177/0017896910386528

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