• Journal Article

Risk and protective factors for methamphetamine use and nonmedical use of prescription stimulants among young adults aged 18 to 25

Citation

Herman-Stahl, M. A., Krebs, C., Kroutil, L., & Heller, D. (2007). Risk and protective factors for methamphetamine use and nonmedical use of prescription stimulants among young adults aged 18 to 25. Addictive Behaviors, 32(5), 1003-1015. DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2006.07.010

Abstract

This article reports on correlates of past-year nonmedical use of prescription stimulants and methamphetamine among young adults aged 18 to 25. Data from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) were used to conduct logistic regression analyses of the demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral correlates of nonmedical stimulant use. The sample size was 23,645. Multivariate analyses revealed that selling drugs and using marijuana and other illegal drugs were associated with increased odds of both methampethamine and nonmedical prescription stimulant use. Females, individuals not enrolled in college, and those who had been arrested were more likely than their counterparts to have used methamphetamine, whereas black individuals and less religious individuals were less likely than their counterparts to have used methamphetamine. Psychological distress, sensation seeking, binge drinking, and college enrollment were associated with increased risks of nonmedical prescription stimulant use, whereas Hispanic and other ethnic identification were associated with decreased risks of nonmedical prescription stimulant use. Different intervention strategies are needed to prevent methamphetamine use versus nonmedical prescription stimulant use.