• Journal Article

Relationships Between Self-Reported Smoking, Household Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Depressive Symptoms in a Pregnant Minority Population

Citation

Tan, S., Courtney, L., El-Mohandes, A. A., Gantz, M., Blake, S. M., Thornberry, J., ... Kiely, M. (2011). Relationships Between Self-Reported Smoking, Household Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Depressive Symptoms in a Pregnant Minority Population. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 15(Suppl. 1), 65-74. DOI: 10.1007/s10995-011-0876-8

Abstract

This study sought to examine relationships between depressive symptoms and prenatal smoking and/or household environmental tobacco smoke exposure (HH-ETSE) among urban minority women. We analyzed private, audio computer-assisted self interview data from a clinic-based sample of 929 minority pregnant women in Washington, DC. Depressive symptoms were assessed via the Beck Depression Inventory Fast Screen. HH-ETSE, current smoking, and former smoking were assessed via self-report. Depression levels and demographic characteristics were compared: (1) among nonsmokers, for those reporting HH-ETSE versus no HH-ETSE; and (2) among smokers, for those reporting current smoking (in last 7 days) versus former smokers. Measures associated with HH-ETSE/current smoking in bivariate analysis at P < 0.20 were included in adjusted logistic regression models. HH-ETSE, as a possible indicator of a social smoking network, was assessed as a mediator for the relationship between depression and current smoking. Results: Non-smokers reporting moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms showed significantly higher adjusted odds of prenatal HH-ETSE (AOR 2.5, 95% CI [1.2, 5.2]). Smokers reporting moderate-to-severe or mild depressive symptoms showed significantly higher adjusted odds of current smoking (AOR 1.9, 95% CI [1.1, 3.5] and AOR 1.8, 95% CI [1.1, 3.1], respectively). Among smokers, HH-ETSE was a significant mediator for the association between moderate-to-severe symptoms and current smoking. In conclusion, health care providers should be aware that depressed urban minority women are at risk of continued smoking/HH-ETSE during pregnancy. Interventions designed to encourage behavior change should include screening for depression, and build skills so that women are better able to address the social environment