• Journal Article

Marfan Syndrome and Quality of Life in the GenTAC Registry

Citation

Goldfinger, J. Z., Preiss, L. R., Devereux, R. B., Roman, M. J., Hendershot, T. P., Kroner, B. L., ... GenTAC Registry Consortium (2017). Marfan Syndrome and Quality of Life in the GenTAC Registry. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 69(23), 2821-2830. DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.04.026

Abstract

BACKGROUND Previous small studies suggested reduced quality of life (QOL) for people with Marfan syndrome (MFS) compared with those without MFS. The national registry of GenTAC (Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions) is a longitudinal observational cohort study of patients with conditions that predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, including MFS. At the time of registry enrollment, GenTAC study participants are asked to complete questionnaires about demographics, medical history, health habits, and QOL.

OBJECTIVES This study assessed QOL in GenTAC participants with MFS and identify associated factors using self-reported data.

METHODS QOL was assessed using the 4 subscales of the Physical Component Summary (PCS) of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36): physical functioning; role limitations due to physical health; bodily pain; and general health. We studied the association of QOL with self-reported demographics, health behaviors, physical impairments, surgeries, comorbid medical conditions, medications, and MFS severity.

RESULTS In the GenTAC registry, 389 adults with MFS completed the SF-36. Mean age was 41 years, 51% were men, 92% were white, and 65% were college graduates. The mean PCS composite score was 42.3. In bivariate analysis, predictors of better QOL included college education, marital status, higher household income, private health insurance, full-time employment, moderate alcohol use, fewer prior surgeries, fewer comorbid conditions, absence of depression, and less severe MFS manifestations. In a multivariable analysis, insurance status and employment remained significant predictors of QOL.

CONCLUSIONS In a large cohort of patients with MFS in the GenTAC registry, health-related QOL was below the population norm. Better QOL was independently associated with socioeconomic factors, not factors related to general health or MFS severity. (C) 2017 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.