• Article

Lubricant use during intercourse and time-to-pregnancy

Citation

McInerney, K. A., Hahn, K. A., Hatch, E. E., Mikkelsen, E. M., Steiner, A. Z., Rothman, K. J., ... Wise, L. A. (2018). Lubricant use during intercourse and time-to-pregnancy: A prospective cohort study. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.15218

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the extent to which lubricant use during intercourse is associated with time-to-pregnancy (TTP).

DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.

SETTING: Denmark and North America.

POPULATION: 6,467 women aged 18-49 years who were not using contraception or fertility treatment.

METHODS: We pooled data from two ongoing prospective cohort studies of pregnancy planners in Denmark (2011-2017) and North America (2013-2017). Female participants completed bimonthly questionnaires for 12 months or until reported pregnancy. After restricting to women without a history of infertility who had been trying to conceive for ≤6 cycles at enrollment, 6,467 women were retained for analysis. Self-reported lubricant use was categorized as water-based/not pH balanced, water-based/pH balanced ("fertility friendly"), silicone-based, oil-based, or a combination of these. We used proportional probabilities models to calculate fecundability ratios (FRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between lubricant use and fecundability after adjusting for cohort and socio-demographic and lifestyle factors.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Fecundability.

RESULTS: At baseline, 17.5% of participants reported use of lubricants, most commonly water-based/not pH balanced (11.4%). Compared with non-use of lubricants, FRs were 1.02 (95% CI: 0.93-1.11) for water-based/not pH balanced lubricant use, 1.01 (95% CI: 0.86-1.18) for water-based/pH balanced ("fertility friendly") lubricant use, 1.23 (95% CI: 0.94-1.61) for oil-based lubricant use, and 1.27 (95% CI: 0.93-1.73) for silicone-based lubricant use. Associations between oil-based lubricant use and fecundability were inconsistent across subgroups of study cohort, age, parity, and intercourse frequency.

CONCLUSIONS: Lubricant use was not associated with reduced fecundability in the preconception cohorts of pregnancy planners studied This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.