• Article

Carbon Dioxide as a solubility “switch” for the reversible dissolution of highly fluorinated complexes and reagents in organic solvents Application to crystallization

The application of gaseous CO2 to nonpolar approtic solvents renders them temporarily and reversibly fluorophilic, enabling them to dissolve highly fluorinated solids. The release of the CO2 pressure causes the quantitative precipitation or crystallization of the fluorinated solute. The technique has been applied to the laboratory preparation of crystals of highly fluorinated complexes for X-ray crystallography.

Citation

Jessop, P. G., Olmstead, M. M., Alban, C. D., Grabenauer, M., Sheppard, D., Eckert, C. A., & Liotta, C. L. (2002). Carbon Dioxide as a solubility “switch” for the reversible dissolution of highly fluorinated complexes and reagents in organic solvents: Application to crystallization. Inorganic Chemistry, 41(13), 3463-3468. DOI: 10.1021/ic020057h

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