New report highlights recent decline in adolescent inhalant use

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. — The number of adolescents ages 12 to 17 who use inhalants decreased from 820,000 in 2011 to about 650,000 in 2012, according to a new report administered by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and conducted by RTI International.

Inhalants are defined in the survey as “liquids, sprays, and gases that people sniff or inhale to get high or to make them feel good.”

Inhalant use among adolescents has generally declined since 2006. Rates decreased from 4.4 percent in 2006 to 2.6 percent in 2012. The decline was also among several demographic groups and in numerous metropolitan areas.

“This downward trend of inhalant use in adolescents is very encouraging,” said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde. “Nevertheless, we must all continue our efforts to raise awareness about the dangers and health risks of this deadly and addictive problem among our youth.”

SAMHSA, through community-based programs like Partnerships for Success and Drug Free Communities, works to reach children and young people with important information about the risks of inhalants and other forms of substance use. 

The report titled, Recent Declines in Adolescent Inhalant Use is based on findings from SAMHSA’s 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) – an annual survey that collects data by administering questionnaires to a representative sample of the populations through face-to-face interviews at their place of residence. RTI has conducted the nationwide survey for SAMHSA since 1988.

The complete report findings are available on the SAMHSA website

For more information about SAMHSA visit: http://www.samhsa.gov/

 

Highlights

  • Report finds the number of adolescents ages 12 to 17 who use inhalants decreased from 820,000 in 2011 to about 650,000 in 2012
  • The report was conducted by RTI International and released by SAMHSA