• Journal Article

Variation in the Relationship Between Mental Illness and Residential Transience by Race-Ethnicity

Citation

Glasheen, C., & Forman-Hoffman, V. L. (2015). Variation in the Relationship Between Mental Illness and Residential Transience by Race-Ethnicity. Psychiatric Services, 66(12), 1357-1360. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ps.201400399

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationship between residential transience (moving frequently) and mental illness. METHODS: The analyses used data for approximately 154,400 adults from the 2008-2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the odds of transience among all adults and by race-ethnicity. RESULTS: Residential transience was more prevalent among adults with mental illness versus adults without mental illness (5.7% versus 1.9%, p<.001). In adjusted models, the odds of transience were twice as high among adults with mental illness (odds ratio=1.99, 95% confidence interval=1.81-2.19) versus those without mental illness. This association differed by race-ethnicity. Among adults reporting multiple races, having a mental illness was associated with a fourfold increase in odds of transience. CONCLUSIONS: Residential transience may be a concern for adults with mental illness, particularly those of multiple races. Further studies should examine whether transience is associated with difficulties in accessing care