• Journal Article

Using imputed genotypes for relative risk estimation in case-parent studies

Citation

Shi, M., London, S. J., Chiu, G. Y., Hancock, D., Zaykin, D., & Weinberg, C. R. (2011). Using imputed genotypes for relative risk estimation in case-parent studies. American Journal of Epidemiology, 173(5), 553-559. DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwq363

Abstract

Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies are often based on imputed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, because component studies were genotyped using different platforms. One would like to include case-parent triad studies along with case-control studies in such meta-analyses. However, there are no published methods for estimating relative risks from imputed data for case-parent triad studies. The authors propose a method for estimating the relative risk for a variant SNP allele based on a log-additive model. Their simulations first confirm that the proposed method performs well with genotyped SNP data. As an empirical test of the method's behavior with imputed SNPs, the authors then apply it to chromosome 22 data from the Mexico City Childhood Asthma Study (1998–2003). For chromosome 22, the authors had data on 7,293 SNPs that were both genotyped and imputed using the software MACH, which relies on linkage disequilibrium with nearby SNPs. Correlation between estimated relative risks based on the actual genotypes and those based on the imputed genotypes was remarkably high (r2 = 0.95), validating this method of relative risk estimation for the case-parent study design. This method should be useful to investigators who wish to conduct meta-analyses using imputed SNP data from both case-parent triad and case-control studies.