• Conference Proceeding

Transcending race? The social relations of individuals with black and white parentage

Citation

Radford, A., & Espenshade, T. (2007). Transcending race? The social relations of individuals with black and white parentage. In Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 11, 2007, New York City, NY,New York: .

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study is to understand how the social relations of individuals with both black and white parentage (black-whites) compare to the social relations of individuals with only one specific racial or ethnic background (monoheritage individuals). Methods. Logistic regression analysis of National Study of College Experience (NSCE) data is used to determine black-whites? odds of interacting with blacks, whites, Asians, and Hispanics on several different measures and whether black-whites? odds differ significantly from those of monoheritage blacks, monoheritage whites, monoheritage Asians, and monoheritage Hispanics. Results. Black-whites are less likely than monoheritage blacks to have social relations with blacks and less likely than monoheritage whites to have social relations with whites. That said, black-whites are 1) more likely than whites, Asians, and Hispanics to interact with blacks; 2) more likely than blacks to interact with whites; and 3) similarly likely to interact with whites as Asians and Hispanics. Finally, despite suggestions in the literature, black-whites are no more able to form relations with groups with whom they have no racial or ethnic connection (Asians and Hispanics) than are monoheritage individuals. Conclusions. Although black-whites are more likely than non-black groups to interact with blacks, black-whites are no longer socially embedded solely in the black community. Black-whites are just as likely as monoheritage Asians and Hispanics to interact with whites and just as likely as monoheritage whites and blacks to interact with Asians and Hispanics.