• Article

Traffic-related air pollution and the incidence of childhood central nervous system tumors

Citation

Danysh, H. E., Mitchell, L. E., Zhang, K., Scheurer, M. E., & Lupo, P. J. (2015). Traffic-related air pollution and the incidence of childhood central nervous system tumors: Texas, 2001-2009. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 62(9), 1572-1578. DOI: 10.1002/pbc.25549

Abstract

BackgroundDue to increasing concerns regarding air pollution and childhood cancer, we conducted a population-based study evaluating the association between traffic-related hazardous air pollutants (1,3-butadiene, benzene, diesel particulate matter [DPM]) and the incidence of childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumors.

ProcedureInformation on children diagnosed with a CNS tumor at

ResultsCensus tracts with medium and medium-high 1,3-butadiene concentrations had higher astrocytoma incidence rates (aIRR [95% confidence interval (CI)]: 1.46 [1.05-2.01] and 1.69 [1.22-2.33], respectively) compared with low concentrations. Census tracts with medium DPM concentrations had higher astrocytoma (aIRR [95%CI]: 1.42 [1.05-1.94]) and medulloblastoma (aIRR [95%CI]: 1.46 [1.01-2.12]) incidence rates compared with low concentrations. Increased concentrations of 1,3-butadiene and benzene were strongly associated with increased PNET incidence rates, but were not statistically significant. No associations were detected with JPA or ependymoma incidence.

ConclusionsIn one of the largest studies of its kind, our results suggest positive associations between hazardous air pollutants and incidence of astrocytoma (1,3-butadiene and DPM) and medulloblastoma (DPM). Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1572-1578. (c) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.