• Journal Article

Systematic review of treatments for chronic spontaneous urticaria with inadequate response to licensed first-line treatments

Citation

Mitchell, S., Balp, M. M., Samuel, M., McBride, D., & Maurer, M. (2015). Systematic review of treatments for chronic spontaneous urticaria with inadequate response to licensed first-line treatments. International Journal of Dermatology, 54(9), 1088-1104. DOI: 10.1111/ijd.12727

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) are sometimes unresponsive to nonsedating, second-generation, H1 antihistamines; this study summarizes published clinical evidence for patients who remain symptomatic despite treatment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, via a systematic literature review, clinical evidence of management strategies for patients with CSU who remain symptomatic despite approved use of nonsedating H1 antihistamines. METHODS: Using a prespecified protocol, we searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library (1 January 1960-20 December 2011), and published conference abstracts (2010-2012). Rigorous criteria identified trials in patients with CSU who had a history of inadequate response to previous treatment or had used combination treatments. Trials evaluating treatment-naive patients or first-line therapies were excluded. RESULTS: Qualitative data synthesized from 26 randomized, controlled trials, four prospective studies, and one retrospective study showed cyclosporine, desloratadine plus dapsone or dipyridamole, montelukast, and omalizumab reduced urticaria activity scores, weals, and pruritus, versus placebo. Optimal treatment doses and durations were unclear due to varying trial durations, outcome measurement scales, and assessment timings. No safety concerns were reported. CONCLUSIONS: This review confirms that available evidence to guide treatment choice for patients with CSU with inadequate response to H1 antihistamines varies in quality. Further research is warranted due to low-quality trials with methodological and reporting limitations