• Journal Article

Separation of high and low metastatic subpopulations from solid tumors by centrifugal elutriation

Citation

Onoda, J. M., Nelson, K. K., Grossi, I., Umbarger, L. A., Taylor, J. D., & Honn, K. V. (1988). Separation of high and low metastatic subpopulations from solid tumors by centrifugal elutriation. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, 187(2), 250-255.

Abstract

We have isolated from murine solid tumors (B16a) subpopulations of cells possessing high and low metastatic potential. Tumors were dispersed by collagenase treatment. The resulting heterogeneous population of cells (i.e., viable and non-viable tumor cells and host cells) were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Four of the fractions (100, 180, 260, 340) contained tumor cells of high viability (greater than 95%) and high purity (less than 1% host cell contamination). The four fractions were characterized by flow cytometry and found to differ in distribution of cells in G1, S and G2. The cell populations were also found to differ in metastatic potential as determined by their ability to form lung colonies following intravenous injection. The 340 fraction was approximately 5-fold more metastatic than the 100 fraction. We also observed that cells from the 100 fraction failed to induce platelet aggregation whereas cells from the 340 fraction induced significant platelet aggregation. These observations demonstrate that cells of B16a tumors are heterogeneous for phenotypic characteristics (i.e., metastatic potential; platelet aggregation, etc.) and that their ability to induce platelet aggregation is positively correlated with metastatic potential