• Journal Article

Relationships between substance use and recent deployments among women and men in the military

Citation

Federman, E., Bray, R., & Kroutil, L. (2000). Relationships between substance use and recent deployments among women and men in the military. Military Psychology, 12(3), 205-220. DOI: 10.1207/S15327876MP1203_3

Abstract

Examined whether substance use was associated with deployment in the past 30 days among women and men in the military using data from the 1995 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel. Data were collected via anonymous questionnaires administered during group sessions conducted by 2-person civilian field teams at 59 selected military installations between April and August 1995. Descriptive analyses were employed to examine the prevalence of substance use among deployed women and men compared to their nondeployed counterparts. Regression models showed higher rates of heavy alcohol use among deployed women and men than among those not deployed. This relationship was particularly notable for women. Deployment also was found to be associated with higher rates of cigarette use, nonheavy alcohol use, and alcohol dependence in men. Implications of these findings, such as negative effects on unit functioning and the potential for work related injuries, are discussed along with directions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)