• Journal Article

Reasons for teachers' adaptation of substance use prevention curricula in schools with non-white student populations

Citation

Ringwalt, C., Vincus, A., Ennett, S., Johnson, R., & Rohrbach, L. A. (2004). Reasons for teachers' adaptation of substance use prevention curricula in schools with non-white student populations. Prevention Science, 5(1), 61-67.

Abstract

In this study we investigate reasons why teachers adapt substance use prevention curricula in the nation's middle schools. We hypothesize that these reasons will be most salient in schools with racially and ethnically diverse student populations, for whom teachers may believe it appropriate to tailor their curricula. The study sample comprised a nationally representative sample of lead substance use prevention teachers in the nation's middle schools. Respondents answered questions concerning eight student problems or needs that constituted reasons why they might adapt their prevention lessons. Controlling for a variety of school and teacher characteristics, we found that teachers in high minority schools were more likely to adapt curricula in response to three of the eight characteristics presented: youth violence, limited English proficiency, and various racial/ethnic or cultural groups. We suggest that curriculum developers make a systematic effort to understand how teachers are adapting their curricula in high minority schools and incorporate these modifications, if found effective, into their curricula