• Article

Pulse synchronized contractions Rhythmic contractions in large arteries in synchrony with the heart beat

The classical view of the smooth muscle wall of large arteries is that they behave as passive elastic tubes. According to this view, the arteries are rhythmically distended by the pulse wave versus undergoing rhythmic activation during the cardiac cycle. Data obtained over the past several decades have shown this description not to be correct. In dogs, cats, rabbits, rats and man rhythmic contractions occur in synchrony with the cardiac cycle in large conduit arteries. These contractions, denoted pulse synchronized contractions (PSCs), are neurogenic in origin with their pacemaker in the right atrium. The phasing of the PSC has the upstroke of the contractions during the rising phase of the pulse wave. This has been suggested to serve to limit vessel wall distension by the pulse wave. Further evaluation of PSCs is required to understand the clinical-pathologic role that they may play

Citation

Mangel, A. W., & Mangel, T. P. (2019). Pulse synchronized contractions: Rhythmic contractions in large arteries in synchrony with the heart beat. Journal of Cardiology Research, 2(1), [13].