• Journal Article

Psoriasis patients' willingness to accept side-effect risks for improved treatment efficacy

Citation

Kauf, T. L., Yang, J. C., Kimball, A. B., Sundaram, M., Bao, Y. J., Okun, M., ... Johnson, F. R. (2015). Psoriasis patients' willingness to accept side-effect risks for improved treatment efficacy. Journal of Dermatological Treatment, 26(6), 507-513. DOI: 10.3109/09546634.2015.1034071

Abstract

Background: Previous studies suggest that efficacy is more important than side-effect risks to psoriasis patients. However, those studies did not consider potentially fatal risks of biologic treatments. Objective: To quantify the risks patients are willing to accept for improvements in psoriasis symptoms. Methods: Adults with a self-reported physician diagnosis of psoriasis were recruited through the National Psoriasis Foundation. Using a discrete-choice experiment, patients completed a series of nine choice questions, each including a pair of hypothetical treatments. Treatments were defined by severity of plaques, body surface area (BSA), and 10-year risks of tuberculosis, serious infection and lymphoma. Results: For complete clearance of 25% BSA with mild plaques, respondents (n = 1608) were willing to accept a 20% (95% confidence interval: 9-26%) risk of serious infection, 10% (5-15%) risk of tuberculosis and 2% (1-3%) risk of lymphoma. For complete clearance of 25% BSA with severe plaques, respondents were willing to accept a 54% (48-62%) risk of serious infection, 36% (28-49%) risk of tuberculosis and 8% (7-9%) risk of lymphoma. Limitations: Respondents were asked to evaluate hypothetical scenarios. Actual treatment choices may differ. Conclusion: Respondents were willing to accept risks above likely clinical exposures for improvements in psoriasis symptoms. Individual risk tolerances may vary.