• Journal Article

Prevalence and correlates of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in a population-based survey of young women in low-income neighborhoods of Northern California. The Young Women's Survey Team

Citation

Buchacz, K., McFarland, W., Hernandez, M., Klausner, J. D., Page-Shafer, K., Padian, N., ... Katz, M. H. (2000). Prevalence and correlates of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in a population-based survey of young women in low-income neighborhoods of Northern California. The Young Women's Survey Team. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 27(7), 393-400.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and may enhance transmission of HIV. However, population-based estimates of HSV-2 prevalence and correlates of infection are rare. GOALS: To obtain population-based estimates of HSV-2 prevalence and to identify demographic and sexual behavioral correlates of infection among women in low-income communities of Northern California. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized, single-stage, cluster sample, cross-sectional survey of women age 18 to 29 years who reside in 1990 US Census block groups at the lowest tenth percentile for household income. RESULTS: The survey-weighted prevalence of HSV-2 infection was 34.8% (95% CI, 30.4-39.2). Factors independently associated with HSV-2 seropositivity were black race, older age, lower income, parity, greater number of lifetime male sexual partners, earlier onset of sexual intercourse, sex work, history of sexually transmitted disease (STD), and cocaine use. CONCLUSION: The high prevalence of HSV-2 and the strong correlation with sexual risk underscores the potential for further spread of STD, including HIV, in this young population