• Journal Article

Pregnant and nonpregnant women in Cape Town, South Africa: Drug use, sexual behavior, and the need for comprehensive services

Citation

Jones, H., Browne, F., Myers, B. J., Carney, T., Ellerson, R., Kline, T., ... Wechsberg, W. (2011). Pregnant and nonpregnant women in Cape Town, South Africa: Drug use, sexual behavior, and the need for comprehensive services. International Journal of Pediatrics, 2011, Article ID 353410. DOI: 10.1155/2011/353410

Abstract

The multiple risks associated with methamphetamine use are of serious concern for women. These risks and consequences are magnified during pregnancy. This secondary analysis of a parent study compared 26 pregnant to 356 nonpregnant women in Cape Town, South Africa, on selected demographic, psychosocial, and HIV-risk domains to identify their treatment service needs. Proportionally, more pregnant than nonpregnant women are using methamphetamine, P = .01, although a very high rate of women used methamphetamine. Women reported similar monthly rates of sexual intercourse, but pregnant women were significantly less likely to report condom use, P < .0001, maintaining their risky behavior. Both groups reported elevated Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale CES-D means, suggesting a need for depression treatment. Results demonstrate a pervasive need for women's comprehensive treatment, regardless of pregnancy status. Moreover, findings support the urgent need for women-focused and pregnancy-specific treatment services for methamphetamine use. Finally, a job-skills training/employment component focus is suggested