• Journal Article

Predictors of job satisfaction among active duty and reserve/guard personnel in the US military

Citation

Sanchez, R., Bray, R., Vincus, A., & Bann, C. (2004). Predictors of job satisfaction among active duty and reserve/guard personnel in the US military. Military Psychology, 16(1), 19-35. DOI: 10.1207/s15327876mp1601_2

Abstract

In this study, we examined psychological, demographic, and physical predictors of job satisfaction among military personnel across the Armed Forces. Data were collected from 24,881 members of the Active Duty and Reserve/Guard components. Overall, military job satisfaction was higher among Reserve/Guard personnel than among those on Active Duty. Separate regression models for the 2 components revealed generally similar predictors of job satisfaction. The 2 strongest predictors were the perception of a relatively high level of job pressure experienced by military personnel and the belief that the biggest problem in one's life was the result of job-related issues (such as a supervisor) rather than nonjob issues (such as health or family). Findings suggest areas in which the military can intervene to increase the satisfaction of personnel and presumably their likelihood of remaining in the military. Because considerable job pressure may be inherent in the nature of the military mission, attention should be given to ensuring that personnel learn and use effective coping skills to manage stressors