• Chapter

Posttraumatic stress after the 9/11 attacks An examination of national, local, and special population studies

The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on the morning of September 11, 2001, have shattered assumptions of safety for many people living in the United States and abroad. Whether one was in New York, Washington DC, other parts of the country, or elsewhere in the world, the images of how the disaster unfolded and the subsequent rescue, recovery, and rebuilding efforts are apt to be easily recollected from memory. The events are still a part of our everyday experience, filtered through the resulting war on terrorism and subsequent threats and attacks in other parts of the world by terrorist groups.

Citation

DiGrande, L., Fox, R., & Neria, Y. (2009). Posttraumatic stress after the 9/11 attacks: An examination of national, local, and special population studies. In M. J. Morgan (Ed.), Palgrave: The impact of 9/11 of psychology and education: The day that changed everything? Palgrave Macmillan. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230101593_5