• Article

Optimization of tumor-targeted gene delivery by engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium

Background: Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium has been demonstrated as a potential gene delivery vector. Previous findings induce the necessity to optimize tumor selectivity and bacterial dosing in relation to tumor volume and intratumoral therapeutic gene expression. Materials and Methods: Attenuated Salmonella VNP20009 and VNP20047 (expressing cytosine deaminase) were systemically administered to tumor-bearing rats. The bacteria were quantified in tumor and normal organs. Conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil was evaluated using thin layer chromatography. Results: Tumor colonization efficiency was dependent on Salmonella density, administration route and tumor volume. Colonization of normal tissues gradually decreased with time, while intratumoral proliferation of bacteria remained high during the follow-up period. The Optimal Therapeutic Dose (OTD) was found to be 5.10(7) cfu/rat. Intratumoral VNP20047-expressed CDase leading to the conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU was detected in vivo. Conclusion: Our results indicate the need to define an OTD, probably for each species, when using genetically engineered Salmonella as a tumor- and species-selective vector in cancer therapy

Citation

Mei, S. P., Theys, J., Landuyt, W., Anne, J., & Lambin, P. (2002). Optimization of tumor-targeted gene delivery by engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium. Anticancer Research, 22(6A), 3261-3266.