• Journal Article

Occupational and environmental exposure correlates of adverse live-birth outcomes among 1032 US Navy women

Citation

Hourani, L., & Hilton, S. (2000). Occupational and environmental exposure correlates of adverse live-birth outcomes among 1032 US Navy women. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 42(12), 1156-1165.

Abstract

The integration of women into non-traditional military occupations raises questions concerning the impact of such jobs on women's reproductive health. This study examines the extent to which US Navy women in their reproductive years report exposures to potential occupational and environmental hazards, and the degree to which such exposures are associated with self-reported adverse live-birth outcomes. Data from a survey of pregnant Navy women provided both maternal and paternal exposure information on more than 1000 active-duty women. Self-reported exposures to heavy metals, pesticides, petroleum products, and other chemicals were associated with adverse live-birth outcomes at the bivariate level. Only a father's exposure to pesticides at work predicted an adverse live-birth outcome (preterm delivery) in multivariate models. Maternal occupational exposures may exert their influence through maternal health and/or pregnancy complications and may act as mediators of health-reproductive outcome relationships