• Journal Article

National malaria control and scaling up for impact: The Zambia experience through 2006

Citation

Steketee, R. W., Sipilanyambe, N., Chimumbwa, J., Banda, J. J., Mohamed, A., Miller, J., ... Campbell, C. C. (2008). National malaria control and scaling up for impact: The Zambia experience through 2006. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 79(1), 45-52.

Abstract

With its 2006–2011 National Malaria Strategic Plan, Zambia committed to control malaria at a national scale. This scale-up for impact approach was facilitated by sound business planning and financing in 2006 of approximately US$35 million. Compared with surveys in 2001 and 2004, a 2006 national survey of 14,681 persons in 2,999 households at the end of the transmission season showed substantial coverage increases for preventive interventions. Ownership and use rates of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) among vulnerable groups doubled, with 44% of households owning ITNs and 23% of children less than five years of age and 24% of pregnant women using them. Roll Back Malaria Abuja targets for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) were exceeded, with 62% of pregnant women receiving at least two doses of IPTp. As of 2006, Zambia is demonstrating substantial progress toward the national targets (80% population coverage rates for the interventions) and aspires to show that malaria need not be its leading health problem, and that malaria control is a sound national investment.