• Journal Article

The NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene polymorphism and lung cancer: differential susceptibility based on smoking behavior

Citation

Xu, L. L., Wain, J. C., Miller, D., Thurston, S. W., Su, L., Lynch, T. J., & Christiani, D. C. (2001). The NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene polymorphism and lung cancer: differential susceptibility based on smoking behavior. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 10(4), 303-309.

Abstract

We conducted a hospital-based case-control study of 814 lung cancer patients and 1123 controls to examine the association of the NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene polymorphism with lung cancer susceptibility. Using PCR-RFLP genotyping assay techniques, we analyzed DNA samples to detect the variant forms of the NQO1 gene in exon 6 on chromosome 16q. We examined the relationship between lung cancer odds and NQO1 genotypes after adjusting for age, gender, and smoking behavior using generalized additive modeling. We found no overall association between NQO1 genotypes and lung cancer susceptibility, regardless of age, gender, family history of cancer, or histological cell type. However, our data demonstrated that in both former and current smokers, there was an association between NQO1 genotypes and lung cancer susceptibility that was dependent upon cigarette smoking duration and smoking intensity. For both current and former smokers, smoking intensity was more important in predicting cancer risk than smoking duration for all of the genotypes. Among former smokers, individuals with the T/T genotype were predicted to have a greater cancer risk than those with the C/C genotype for smoking durations up to 37 years. The predicted cancer risk for former smokers with the C/T versus T/T genotype depended on both smoking intensity and smoking duration. Our results support the concept that differential susceptibility to lung cancer is a function of both an inheritable trait in NQO1 metabolism and individual smoking characteristics