• Article

Maternal residential proximity to major roadways at delivery and childhood central nervous system tumors

Citation

Danysh, H. E., Zhang, K., Mitchell, L. E., Scheurer, M. E., & Lupo, P. J. (2016). Maternal residential proximity to major roadways at delivery and childhood central nervous system tumors. Environmental Research, 146, 315-322. DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2016.01.012

Abstract

Background: Due to concerns over the impact of traffic-related air pollution on childhood cancers, we evaluated the association between residential proximity to major roadways and childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumors.

Methods: The Texas Cancer Registry provided information on children diagnosed with a CNS tumor at

Results: Maternal residential proximity to major roadways at delivery was positively associated with the odds of offspring having a CNS tumor. Specifically, for every kilometer closer to a major roadway, the odds of offspring having a CNS tumor increased by 30% (95% CI: 1.0, 1.7). Mothers living 500 m from the nearest major roadway. Moreover, compared to mothers living in areas with low roadway density, those living in areas with high roadway density were 51% (95% CI: 1.1, 2.1) more likely to have offspring with any CNS tumor and 4.2-times (95% CI: 1.2, 14.9) more likely to have offspring with an ependymoma. There were no statistically significant associations observed between continuous distance to major roadways and ependymoma as well as between the proximity measures and the other evaluated CNS tumor phenotypic groups.

Conclusions: The results of this large population-based study indicate that mothers who live near major roadways or in areas with high roadway density may be more likely to have offspring with a CNS tumor, particularly an ependymoma. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.