• Article

Marijuana use and fecundability in a North American preconception cohort study

BACKGROUND: The influence of marijuana use on human fertility has not been well studied. We evaluated the association between female and male use of marijuana and fecundability in Pregnancy Study Online, a prospective cohort of North American couples.

METHODS: Female participants completed a baseline questionnaire on which they reported lifestyle and behavioural factors, including frequency of marijuana use within the previous 2 months. Male partners completed an optional baseline questionnaire on similar factors, including marijuana use. Women completed follow-up questionnaires every 8 weeks for 12 months or until pregnancy, initiation of fertility treatment or loss to follow-up, whichever came first. The analysis was restricted to 4194 women (1125 couples) with ≤6 cycles of pregnancy attempt time at study enrolment (2013-2017). Fecundability ratios (FR) and 95% CIs were estimated using proportional probabilities regression models, with adjustment for potential confounders.

RESULTS: Men (14.2%) were more likely than women (11.6%) to be marijuana users. FRs for female marijuana use <1 and ≥1 time/week relative to non-use were 0.99 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.16) and 0.98 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.20), respectively. FRs for male marijuana use <1 and ≥1 time/week relative to non-use were 0.87 (95% CI 0.66 to 1.15) and 1.24 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.70), respectively. Associations for frequent marijuana use (≥1 time/week) were attenuated among non-smoking men (FR=1.21, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.74), but stronger among men reporting intercourse ≥4 times/week (FR=1.35, 95% CI 0.72 to 2.53).

CONCLUSIONS: In this preconception cohort study, there was little overall association between female or male marijuana use and fecundability.

Citation

Wise, L. A., Wesselink, A. K., Hatch, E. E., Rothman, K. J., Mikkelsen, E. M., Sorensen, H. T., & Mahalingaiah, S. (2018). Marijuana use and fecundability in a North American preconception cohort study. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 72(3), 208-215. DOI: 10.1136/jech-2017-209755

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