• Article

Long-term consequences of foodborne infections Foodborne Illness: Latest Threats and Emerging Issues

Foodborne infections with Campylobacter, E. coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Shigella, Toxoplasma gondii, and other pathogens can result in long-term sequelae to numerous organ systems. These include irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, reactive arthritis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, neurological disorders from acquired and congenital listeriosis and toxoplasmosis, and cognitive and developmental deficits due to diarrheal malnutrition or severe acute illness. A full understanding of the long-term sequelae of foodborne infection is important both for individual patient management by clinicians, as well as to inform food safety and public health decision making.

Citation

Batz, MB., Henke, E., & Kowalcyk, B. (2013). Long-term consequences of foodborne infections: Foodborne Illness: Latest Threats and Emerging Issues. Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, 27(3), 599-616. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.idc.2013.05.003

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