• Journal Article

Interagency coordination in response to terrorism: Promising practices and barriers identified in four countries

Citation

Strom, K., & Eyerman, J. (2007). Interagency coordination in response to terrorism: Promising practices and barriers identified in four countries. Criminal Justice Studies A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society, 20(2), 131-147. DOI: 10.1080/14786010701396871

Abstract

Our nation's ability to prepare for and respond to terrorism hinges on multiagency coordination. This study evaluates problems faced by law enforcement and public health agencies in multiagency response situations, drawing on rational choice theory to develop expectations about agencies' abilities to cooperate on common policy goals. Expectations are evaluated using survey data collected from law enforcement and public health officials in four countries: USA, UK, Canada, and Ireland. Results identifying common barriers and promising practices for improving multiagency response indicate that the rational choice model explains some but not all of the findings on coordination.