• Journal Article

The influence of race and gender on student self-reports of sexual harassment by college professors

Citation

Kalof, L., Eby, K. K., Matheson, J., & Kroska, R. J. (2001). The influence of race and gender on student self-reports of sexual harassment by college professors. Gender and Society, 15(2), 282-302. DOI: 10.1177/089124301015002007

Abstract

A survey of 525 undergraduates found that 40 percent of the women and 28.7 percent of the men had been sexually harassed by a college professor or instructor. Most incidents were gender harassment. While women reported significantly more gender harassment than did men, there were no gender differences in the frequency of unwanted sexual attention or sexual coercion. At least one incident of sexual harassment by a professor was experienced by 30 percent of the Blacks, 30 percent of the Hispanics, 33 percent of the Asians, 30 percent of the students of other minority groups, and 39 percent of the whites. Again, most of the experiences were gender harassment. Among those respondents who had experienced at least one incident of sexual harassment, almost all answered “never” to the question “Have you ever been sexually harassed by a college professor or instructor?” We conclude with some suggestions, particularly the need to improve measurement of the harassment experiences of men and of nonwhite women.