• Journal Article

Health-related quality of life and symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis treated with ruxolitinib versus best available therapy

Citation

Harrison, C. N., Mesa, R. A., Kiladjian, J-J., Al-Ali, H-K., Gisslinger, H., Knoops, L., ... Vannucchi, A. M. (2013). Health-related quality of life and symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis treated with ruxolitinib versus best available therapy. British Journal of Haematology, 162(2), 229-239. DOI: 10.1111/bjh.12375

Abstract

Patients with myelofibrosis (MF) have significant debilitating symptoms, physical disabilities, and poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Here, we report post-hoc analyses of the impact of ruxolitinib, a potent and selective JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, on disease-related symptoms and HRQoL in MF patients from the large phase 3 COMFORT-II study (N = 219). During the follow-up period of 48 weeks, HRQoL and MF-associated symptoms improved from baseline for ruxolitinib-treated patients but remained the same or worsened for best available therapy (BAT)-treated patients. Based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QoL Questionnaire core 30 items (EORTC QLQ-C30), treatment-induced differences in physical and role functioning, fatigue, and appetite loss significantly favoured ruxolitinib versus BAT from week 8 (P < 0·05) up to week 48 (P < 0·05). Ruxolitinib resulted in significantly higher response rates in global health status/QoL and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lymphoma (FACT-Lym) summary scores versus BAT at most time points (P < 0·05). Significant improvements in the Lymphoma subscale (including symptoms of pain, fever, itching, fatigue, weight loss, loss of appetite, and other patient concerns), FACT-General, FACT-Lym trial outcome index, and FACT-Lym total were also observed with ruxolitinib versus BAT starting at week 8 and continuing thereafter. Overall, these data demonstrated that ruxolitinib improved HRQoL in MF patients and further support the use of ruxolitinib for the treatment of symptomatic MF.