• Journal Article

Genetic analysis of the roles of phytochromes A and B1 in the reversed gravitropic response of the lz-2 tomato mutant

Citation

Behringer, F. J., & Lomax, T. (1999). Genetic analysis of the roles of phytochromes A and B1 in the reversed gravitropic response of the lz-2 tomato mutant. Plant, Cell & Environment, 22(5), 551-558. DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-3040.1999.00431.x

Abstract

The lz-2 mutation in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) causes conditional reversal of shoot gravitropism by light. This response is mediated by phytochrome. To further elicit the mechanism by which phytochrome regulates the lz-2 phenotype, phytochrome-deficient lz-2 plants were generated. Introduction of au alleles, which severely block chromophore biosynthesis, eliminated the reversal of hypocotyl gravitropism in continuous red and far-red light. The fri1 and tri1 alleles were introduced to specifically deplete phytochromes A and B1, respectively. In dark-grown seedlings, phytochrome A was necessary for response to high-irradiance far-red light, a complete response to low fluence red light, and also mediated the effects of blue light in a far-red reversible manner. Loss of phytochrome B1 alone did not significantly affect the behaviour of lz-2 plants under any light treatment tested. However, dark-grown lz-2 plants lacking both phytochrome A and B1 exhibited reduced responses to continuous red and were less responsive to low fluence red light and high fluence blue light than plants that were deficient for phytochrome A alone. In high light, full spectrum greenhouse conditions, lz-2 plants grew downward regardless of the phytochrome deficiency. These results indicate that phytochromes A and B1 play significant roles in mediating the lz-2 phenotype and that at least one additional phytochrome is involved in reversing shoot gravitropism in this mutant