• Journal Article

Gender Differences in Young Adults' Beliefs About Sunscreen Use

Citation

Abroms, L., Jorgensen, C. M., Southwell, B., Geller, A. C., & Emmons, K. M. (2003). Gender Differences in Young Adults' Beliefs About Sunscreen Use. Health Education and Behavior, 30(1), 29-43. DOI: 10.1177/1090198102239257

Abstract

This study employs focus group methodology to explore gender differences in sunscreen use. Guided by the theory of reasoned action, males and females were found to differ on each of the following constructs: behavior, behavioral beliefs, and normative beliefs. Males and females differed in their sunscreen use, with females adopting a more preventive style of sunscreen use and males a more reactive style. Males and females differed in their salient beliefs that motivated their sunscreen use, many of which were related to traditional American gender roles. In addition, although males and females were aware of both positive and negative sources of normative beliefs regarding sunscreen use, females received more encouragement from their mothers and peers than males. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the design of future interventions.