• Journal Article

Examining the Impact of Patient Characteristics and Symptomatology on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Among Foreign-born Tuberculosis Cases in the US and Canada

Citation

Colson, P. W., Couzens, G., Royce, R., Kline, T., Chavez-Lindell, T., Welbel, S., ... Hirsch-Moverman, Y. (2014). Examining the Impact of Patient Characteristics and Symptomatology on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Among Foreign-born Tuberculosis Cases in the US and Canada. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 16(1), 125-135. DOI: 10.1007/s10903-013-9787-7

Abstract

Foreign-born individuals represent the majority of TB cases in the US/Canada. Little is known about their TB knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs (KAB). Cross-sectional survey was conducted in 22 sites in the US/Canada among foreign-born adults with active TB. Multiple regression was used to examine KAB factors against covariates. Of 1,475 participants interviewed, most answered the six knowledge items correctly. Significant predictors of correct knowledge included region of origin, education, income, age, visa status, place of diagnosis, BCG vaccination, and TB symptoms. Significant predictors of higher perceived risk/stigma scores included region of origin, age, place of diagnosis, English fluency, time in the US/Canada, TB symptoms, and household rooms. This study examines associations between TB KAB and patient and disease characteristics in foreign-born individuals in the US/Canada. The findings call for improved health education, along with efforts to reduce stigma and enhance realistic risk assessments