• Journal Article

Environmental factors and high risk of esophageal cancer among men in coastal South Carolina

Citation

Brown, L. M., Blot, W. J., Schuman, S. H., Smith, V. M., Ershow, A. G., Marks, R. D., & Fraumeni, J. F. (1988). Environmental factors and high risk of esophageal cancer among men in coastal South Carolina. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 80(20), 1620-5.

Abstract

A case-control study involving interviews of 207 men with esophageal cancer and 422 control subjects or their next of kin was conducted to identify reasons for the unusually high rates of esophageal cancer among men in coastal South Carolina. Tobacco and alcohol, including moonshine, were identified as the major determinants of esophageal cancer risk. Increased risk was also associated with low intake of fresh fruits but not with drinking of local herbal teas. The findings suggest that efforts aimed at reducing tobacco and alcohol use will help to lower the elevated rates of esophageal cancer in coastal South Carolina.