• Journal Article

Efficacy of Canakinumab vs. triamcinolone acetonide according to multiple gouty arthritis-related health outcomes measures

Citation

Hirsch, J. D., Gnanasakthy, A., Lale, R., Choi, K., & Sarkin, A. J. (2014). Efficacy of Canakinumab vs. triamcinolone acetonide according to multiple gouty arthritis-related health outcomes measures. International Journal of Clinical Practice, 68(12), 1503-1507. DOI: 10.1111/ijcp.12521

Abstract

Aim: Canakinumab (CAN), a selective, fully human, anti-IL-1 monoclonal antibody, has demonstrated long-term benefits in gouty arthritis (GA) patients, who have contraindications for, or are unresponsive or intolerant of, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or colchicine (two trials:beta-RELIEVED [n=228]; beta-RELIEVED II [n=226]). The trials collected different responses, including patient-reported outcomes (PRO). A composite response end-point (CRE) was used to interpret each patient's overall response to treatment. <br><br>Methods: Data from beta-RELIEVED trials were pooled for this retrospective analysis. The CRE representing overall change in GA-related health outcomes, from baseline to 12weeks, included clinical markers; PROs from the Gout Impact Scale (GIS); and the SF-36 bodily pain scale. Response to each variable (i.e. markedly important difference) was determined a priori. Variable values [1 (responder) or 0 (non-responder)] were summed to create a CRE score for each patient. <br><br>Results: For eight of 12 variables measured, the percentage of CAN responders was significantly greater than for TA (p<0.05). On average, patients receiving CAN met a higher percentage of response criteria (65%) than patients receiving triamcinolone acetonide (TA) (49%), p<0.001. Mean CRE scores were significantly higher for CAN vs. TA (mean [SD]; 4.7 [2.7] vs. 3.7 [2.4], p<0.001). Treatment differences remained even after serially removing individual responder variables and domains from the composite end-point, indicating that the differences between CAN and TA were robust. <br><br>Conclusion: CAN was superior to TA across multiple health-outcome variables comprising clinical markers and PRO over 12weeks in patients contraindicated, intolerant or unresponsive to NSAIDs and/or colchicine