• Journal Article

Economic evaluation of treatment for MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections in Glasgow hospitals

Citation

Seaton, R. A., Johal, S., Coia, J. E., Reid, N., Cooper, S., & Jones, B. (2014). Economic evaluation of treatment for MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections in Glasgow hospitals. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, 33(3), 305-311. DOI: 10.1007/s10096-013-1956-z

Abstract

In the UK, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-associated skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are predominantly managed in the hospital using intravenous (IV) glycopeptides. We set out to explore the potential for and relative healthcare costs of earlier hospital discharge through switch to oral antibiotic therapy (linezolid or rifampicin and doxycycline) or continuation of IV therapy (teicoplanin) via an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) service. Over 16 months, 173 patients were retrospectively identified with MRSA SSTI, of whom 82.8 % were treated with IV therapy. Thirty-seven patients were potentially suitable for earlier discharge with outpatient therapy. The model assumed 3 days of inpatient management and a maximum of 14 days of outpatient therapy. For the status quo, where patients received only inpatient care with IV therapy, hospital costs were calculated at A 12,316 pound per patient, with 97 % of costs accounted for by direct bed day costs. The mean total cost savings achievable through OPAT or oral therapy was estimated to be A 6,136 pound and A 6,159 pound per patient treated, respectively. A significant proportion of patients with MRSA SSTI may be suitable for outpatient management with either oral therapy or via OPAT, with the potential for significant reduction in healthcare costs