• Journal Article

Early helminth infections are inversely related to anemia, malnutrition, and malaria and are not associated with inflammation in 6- to 23-month-old Zanzibari children

Citation

Kung'u, J. K., Goodman, D., Haji, H. J., Mohamed, M., Wright, V. J., Bickle, Q. D., ... Stoltzfus, R. J. (2009). Early helminth infections are inversely related to anemia, malnutrition, and malaria and are not associated with inflammation in 6- to 23-month-old Zanzibari children. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 81(6), 1062-1070. DOI: 10.4269/ajtmh.2009.09-0091

Abstract

Helminths aggravate anemia and malnutrition among school children. We studied this association in a cross-sectional study of 6- to 23-month-old Zanzibari children (N = 2322) and a sub-sample of 690 children matched on age and helminth infection status. Ascaris, hookworm, and Trichuris infections were diagnosed along with recent fever, malaria infection, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) and hemoglobin concentration (Hb). Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), C-reactive protein (CRP), height, and weight were measured in the sub-sample. Infected children had higher Hb (? = 5.44 g/L, P < 0.001) and MUAC-for-age Z score (? = 0.30 Z, P < 0.001) compared with uninfected children after adjusting for covariates. Although helminths were not associated with inflammation, their association with Hb or MUAC-for-age Z score was modified by inflammation. Malaria-infected children were less likely to be infected with helminths (adjusted odds ratios 0.63 [95% confidence interval: 0.49, 0.81]). Non-anemic, better nourished, or non-malaria-infected children may be more exploratory of their environments and therefore increase their exposure to soil-transmitted helminths.